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Weed Abatement using Goats for Weed Control and Brush Removal in California

Goat Weed Abatement

FALL/WINTER 2014 GRAZING SEASON

"Thank you to all of our clients for making 2014 one of our best years yet! It's wonderful to make our yearly migration around the state, seeing famiiar faces, watching the landscape become more fire safe with each successive graze, and acquiring new friends and clients along the way!"

Fall is an optimal time of year to graze and Living Systems would love to hear about your property and how our animals might assist in its restoration.

 

Living Systems has distinguished itself for its innovative approach to land management and deep commitment to community and environment.  We are an environmentally and socially responsible business that approaches land management holistically.  Our work in the area of fire mitigation focuses on ecological fuel management in Wildland / Urban Interface areas.  In addition, we facilitate habitat restoration in riparian and other biologically sensitive areas and vegetation management of noxious and invasive weeds, and brush, including yellow star thistle, cape ivy, poison hemlock, and French & Scotch Broom.


Goats and sheep have been used for countless years as land management tools and are a popular alternative to the conventions of mowing, disking, and burning.  Managed Grazing takes into account multiple levels of ecology and environment including: vegetation types, soil types, watershed functions, plant recovery mechanisms, nutrient flow and energy cycling.  All can be managed, monitored and improved with proper management procedures.

              

      “California Indians practiced resource management at four levels of biological organization:

the organism, the population, the plant community, and the landscape. 

They used resource management techniques at each of these levels, or scales,

to promote the persistence of individual plants,  plant populations, animal populations,

plant associations, and habitat relationships in many different vegetation types in California.” 

- from M. Kat Anderson's Tending the Wild: Native American Knowledge

and the Management of California's Natural Resources